Our coffees

For all coffees we buy we have an extensive description with background information about the farm or partner where the coffee is sourced.
We roast several times a week and keep limited stock of roasted coffee to guarantee freshness.

Coffee can be stored for years, however, the best results are achieved between about two and eight weeks after roasting. That’s why we don’t mention an expiry date, but a roasting date on the bottom of our bags.

LA ESPERANZA
Colombia La Esperanza

– click here to read more

LUIS CAMPOS
Costa Rica Luis Campos

– click here to read more

AQUIARES
Costa Rica Aquiares

– click here to read more

DOIPANGKHON
Thailand Doi Pangkhon

– click here to read more

CRISTALINA
Colombia La Cristalina

– click here to read more

InzaBag
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Colombia Inza

The Asociación de Productores de Café del Oriente Caucano (ASORCAFÉ) is based in the municipality of Inzá, Cauca. Founded in 2010 by 10 producers, the group now has 450 smallholder members spread across the valleys of the Macizo Colombiano.
Inzá is located on the border of Cauca, Huila and Tolima states, and benefits from a stable climate thanks to it’s proximity to the surrounding mountains, humid weather patterns from the west and dry winds form the south. Coffee is harvested year round, with the main crop being in November-March. Despite being in a relatively small geographical location, ASORCAFÉ producer a staggering number of profiles. The group has 5 buying points on various sides of the mountain, and there are a number of microclimates that producers benefit from.

Due to long standing traditions of land division through inheritance, the average farm size in the state of Cauca is less than a hectare. As such, cooperatives such as ASORCAFÉ play an incredibly important role in the region, allowing smallholders to share resources and negotiate collectively to fetch better prices for their coffees. In many ways ASORCAFÉ is more like a small town than alliance of coffee producers. For an annual fee, they provide social security, health benefits, bereavement leave, even funeral costs are covered by the association. They have rigorous entry standards, such as having clean and well maintained fermentation tanks and pulpers. These standards are not based solely on coffee quality; having (or working towards having) a plot of food crops to ensure self sustaining food security is another entry condition. Entry also allows access to fertilisers, including pre-finance if a member doesn’t have the liquidity. It also gives access to their seed bank – producers mark the trees on their farms that give the best quality, then reserve some of these cherries to give to other producers in the association. In this way, low yield trees with poor cup quality are replaced by higher yielding trees with the best cup profiles. As a result, the rising tide really does lift all boats, as every producer works together to improve the association as a whole, rather than working individually or in competition with their neighbours.

Region

Huila / Cauca department

Plantation

Inza Cooperative

Altitude

1.700 metres above sea level

Plant variety

Caturra, Colombia

Process

Washed

Tasting notes

Brown sugar, shortbread, dried orange

Curious about this coffee?
Colombia-lacristalinanatural-klein
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Colombia la Cristalina

The La Cristalina plantation is located near Quimbaya in the Quindo department. The plantation has been owned by the Grajales for over 100 years. Maria Mercedes Grajales is now the 5th generation at the helm of La Cristalina. The total plantation is approximately 19 hectares, of which 14 hectares are planted with coffee. about 5 hectares of the plantation are planted with other trees such as orange, ‘platano’ and ‘cafatero’. The majority of the plants on the Cristalina plantation are of the Castillo variety.

 

Natural lot

The pickers are encouraged to pick the coffee at its optimal maturity. For that selective picking process La Cristalina works with the long-term pickers that get paid far more than normal. Most pickers come to this farm for 10+ years.

After picking the cherries are floated intensively to remove the less dense and defected cherries.

The coffee is placed on “carros corredizos” and drying tunnels with direct sun exposure for the first 48 hours. After the humidity is down to about 40% it is placed in GrainPro for 36 hours to create its fruity punch in its cup. During fermentation the temperature and PH is monitored and documented every 3 hours. After fermentation the coffee goes back to the drying beds where it is also moved every 3 hours. The total process takes around 15 days, depending on the weather.

The coffee is very fragrant and expressive, with flavours of cherry, mandarin and strawberry.

 

Decaf lot

The La Cristalina coffee is decaffeinated by means of ‘Sugar Cane’. A characteristic of this decaf process is that the coffee retains many of its aromas. In addition, it often produces a very sweet coffee. The result is a sweet coffee with citrus flavors and a spicy aftertaste.

Region

Quimbaya, Quindio

Plantation

La Cristalina

Altitude

1.450 – 1.500 metres above sea level

Plant variety

Castillo

Process

Washed Decaf

Tasting notes

Milk chocolate, molasses & orange

Curious about this coffee?

Region

Quimbaya, Quindio

Plantation

La Cristalina

Altitude

1.450 – 1.500 metres above sea level

Plant variety

Castillo

Process

Natural

Tasting notes

Cherry, mandarin & strawberry

Curious about this coffee?
DOIPANGKHON_ZAK
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@beanspire

Thailand Doi Pangkhon

Doi Pangkhon has come a long way in a short time. We partnered with this farmer group in Chiang Rai in 2016. While the coffee is still relatively new to the international market, the 300 Akha Hilltribe farmers at Doi Pangkhon (which means Timberland Peak) have been growing and milling coffee for almost 40 years in this area, respecting their old traditions and their natural environment.
The mineral-rich soil and next-to-perfect growing conditions give not just their old varieties, but even their Catimor shrubs a surprising complexity and spicy punch. This sparked Ata and Pupae, brother and sister and third generation coffee growers, to actively seek the involvement of specialty buyers. Each farmer typically produces about 1-2 tons of parchment. We are working with about 20 families from Doi Pangkhon. Essentially, these are microlots grouped together. All of the villagers belong to Akha Hilltribe and they are very young for coffee farmers, mostly aged 25-35 years old. This is something very unique about Thailand as an origin since it’s an upper middle income country. It is a coffee growing industry that’s actually working and attractive to the next generation, relative to other origins.

One of only a few groups in Thailand to employ a Kenya-style washed, double fermentation: all coffee is hand picked, depulped, dry fermented for 48 hours, wet fermented for 8 hours, washed with mountain water, then sun dried on raised bamboo beds.

The result is a very clean coffee with typical ‘Asian’ spicy flavors, but combined with a sweetness not often found in other Asian coffees.

Region

Chang Rai

Plantation

Doi Pangkhon Group

Altitude

1.250 – 1.500 metres above sea level

Plant variety

Typica, Bourbon & Catuai

Process

Washed

Tasting notes

Cedar, cocoa & spicy

Curious about this coffee?
Shakiso
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Shakiso1@plotcoffee

@plotcoffee

Ethiopia Shakiso

This exceptional lot was processed, dry milled and exported by Testi Coffee, a family-run business owned and managed by the Yonis family. Faysel A. Yonis established Testi Coffee in 2009 as a coffee exporting company.

Today, Testi owns and/or operates washing stations in Guji, Yirgacheffe, Sidamo and Limu – all premier coffee producing regions. They work with smallholder farmers, intending to secure the very best prices for their coffee so that they can pay fair prices for the cherry delivered. They are currently also building a warehouse in Shakiso where they can process natural coffees locally, in the region where the coffee is grown. This keeps more revenue in the communities where the coffees are produced.

Testi’s objective is quality and building long term business relationships. Their washing stations are very well run and they do diligent work through sorting and screening to get clean and quality beans for export. Testi always adheres to the very highest quality standards to prepare and deliver nothing but high-quality beans.

As of 2018, Testi has launched a quality improvement project at each washing stations that they operate. Their PCS (Premium Cherry Selection) Project fully controls all aspects of harvest and processing to ensure that the fantastic natural quality of the coffee is maintained at each step. They are also making the most of the market liberalisation to benefit the small producers that they work with. Social projects, such as building new classrooms for the local school near their Guji processing factory are also important, and with support from their importing partners they hope to do even more in the future. They also currently have a drinking/household water provisioning project underway in Guji, and they plan to extend this to other communities in the future.

The name ‘Testi’ means Happy or Happiness in Harrari language (it is also the name of Faysel’s middle son). Certainly, Testi is bringing happiness to small scale producers and us!

It is located in one of our favorite regions in Ethiopia: Guji woreda. The coffee cherries come from farmers in the Shakiso region. About 800 smallholder farmers deliver their coffee cherries to the Gigesa washing station where the coffee cherries are processed. The farms that supply Gigesa are located at 1800 to 2000 meters above sea level. Gigesa washing station exports about 6 containers of coffee every year.

The coffee is very layered and complex with flavors of peach, lemon, and hibiscus.

Region

 Guij Zone

Plantation

Shakiso

Altitude

1.850 -2.000 metres above sea level

Plant variety

Heirloom

Process

Washed

Tasting notes

Peach, lemon & hibiscus

Curious about this coffee?
Brazil-Dulce
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Brazil Dulce

Our Brazilian coffee comes from Capricornio. They established Capricornio to breathe new life in five regions in the southern states of Paraná and São Paolo, which until the 1960s, were one of the country’s most vibrant coffee producing regions. Due to terrible frosts and the rise of the major coffee regions up north, its production stagnated, leading many coffee farmers to move north, leaving their farms underdeveloped. Now, due to climate change, these regions have become attractive to farmers again, but hardly anyone saw specialty potential.
That is until Capricornio found 20 passionate farmers and started the Four Seasons project: they helped them turn their farms into modern, ecologically sustainable farms and process their coffees to the highest standards.

Now, they have started to show what these coffee regions have to offer the specialty coffee world. Because of its uniquely low latitude (around the tropic of Capricorn at 23ºS), coffee here endures more stress while developing. This leads to large, slowly ripened cherries with surprisingly complex cup profiles, similar to what happens at higher altitudes. We were impressed not only by the coffee’s cup quality, but by the company’s achievements in processing and creating coffees in close cooperation with specialty roasters.

The Dulce has a classic Brazilian cup profile: good body and sweetness, mild acidity and loads of nutty and chocolate flavours. Very good everyday espresso.

Region

Paraná

Plantation

Capricornio Coffee

Altitude

700 – 1.000 metres above sea level

Plant variety

Bourbon

Process

Natural & Pulped Natural mix

Tasting notes

Chocolat & walnut

Curious about this coffee?
LaEsperanzaZak
Lacristalina-decaf_1

Colombia La Esperanza Pink Bourbon

Producer William Gomez has been working in coffee for over 20 years. His farm is located in the Acevedo region in the Huila department in southwest Colombia. Finca La Esperanza sits at an altitude of 1.600 meter above sea level and is about 8 Hectares. When William first began farming he only had 1,000 coffee trees and after that first harvest he used that income to invest back into the farm. He has been doing that every year and now he has a little over 15,000 trees. His dedication and hard work are evident in the quality of coffee he produces.

This lot is from the Pink Bourbon variety which is rapidly gaining popularity among producers and roasters. For producers it’s an interesting variety because it’s resistance to leaf rust, climate adaptability and good yield. Roasters like this variety for it’s cup profile.  The ripe cherries turn into a orange color (not pink!). Contrary to common belief, it’s not a hybrid of the red and yellow Bourbon varietals. It is more likely to be a mutated Ethiopian variety.

After picking the ripe cherries, the coffee is floated and fermented in the cherry for 16 hours. After depulping the beans are wet fermented for another 16 hours. Lastly the coffee is dried in parabolic driers for 18 – 25 days.

The result is a very sweet cup, with grapefruit, black tea and sugar cane. We really like this coffee as espresso, where you also get some floral notes into the cup.

Region

Acevedo, Huila

Plantation

La Esperanza

Altitude

1.600 metres above sea level

Plant variety

Pink Bourbon

Process

Washed

Tasting notes

Grapefruit, black tea & sugar cane

Curious about this coffee?
costa-rica-scaled

Costa Rica Luis Campos

Cordillera de Fuego micromill grew out of the partnership of two coffee producers in the West Valley region of Costa Rica. Luis Eduardo Campos Varela and José Francisco Fernández Arias wanted to process their own coffee in order to offer a unique coffee. Drawing inspiration from the fermentation process techniques used by the wine industry, the micromill was born in 2016.

The mill started with a maximum capacity of 2000 bags of coffee and has since grown to process around 14,000 bags today. They currently buy coffee from nearly 200 smallholder producers from the West Valley and Tarrazú regions, providing an income for producers to reinvest in their farms. In 2020, Cordillera de Fuego was recognized by ICAFE (Instituto del Café de Costa Rica) as the company that paid the best prices to their producer partners, and as the mill that exported the most specialty coffee.

The team at Cordillera de Fuego have worked to focus on their environmental sustainability as they’ve grown. They use solar panels to provide renewable energy to their office and mill, and have added an oven for drying coffee at the mill which is fueled 98% by the husk that is leftover after dry milling the coffee for exportation. The mill works to avoid the use of agrichemicals, instead opting for natural microorganisms which decompose the organic waste leftover from milling the coffee cherries. These microorganisms help to prevent bad aromas in the mill, and also help to purify the water used to process coffee. This practice also prevents common plagues of insects like flies that typically occur where large amounts of organic waste occurs.

Anaerobic processing at Cordillera de Fuego begins with rigorous cherry sorting and selection. Cherries chosen to undergo anaerobic fermentation must have a very mature Brix degree measurement of its mucilage, measuring around 26%. The cherries that meet the criteria are pulped and placed into stainless steel fermentation tanks with all of their mucilage still on.

Prior to fermentation, another batch of cherries is selected to be the “mucilage donor” for the anaerobic fermentation. These cherries are pulped, and all of the liquid created by the process is added to the stainless steel tanks. Enough of this liquid is added to cover all of the pulped coffee set to be fermented, everything is mixed well, and then the tanks are hermetically sealed to create the anaerobic environment.

Temperature is controlled throughout fermentation, and the process takes 18–23 hours. After 15 hours, the pH is measured constantly to monitor the progress and ensure that fermentation is stopped once all of the sugar has been consumed and before alcohol is produced in the tanks.

The coffee is moved to be sun dried on drying patios. Coffee is moved regularly to ensure even drying, and covered overnight to prevent the coffee from absorbing humidity from the cool environment. Once the coffee reaches 9–12% humidity, the coffee is stored in parchment in clean bags in their warehouse.

All this meticulous work makes for a super clean cup of coffee. You’ll find very pronounced flavours of cinnamon in the coffee along with apple and cocoa notes.
It’s like apple pie in a mug!

Region

West Valley

Plantation

Cordillera de Fuego

Altitude

1.200 – 1.900 metres above sea level

Plant variety

Caturra, Catuai

Process

Honey anaerobic

Tasting notes

Cinnamon, apple pie & cocoa

Curious about this coffee?
AquiaresZak
AquiaresPBZak
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Costa Rica Aquiares

The name Aquiares means “land between rivers” in the Huetar indigenous language, and Aquiares is commonly referred to as “Aquiares Coffee and Community.” It is the largest farm in Costa Rica and home to 1,800 people. Although the farm was founded in 1890, Alfonso Robelo is the man responsible for its transformation a century later. Alfonso arrived in Costa Rica in the 1980’s seeking refuge from the civil war in Nicaragua, where he was politically active. When politics soured into violence, he fled the country to keep his family and himself safe after receiving several threats against his life. Once in Costa Rica, Alfonso began building the Aquiares community on the enchanting slopes of the Turrialba volcano, a lush area of forests, rivers, fauna, and bright flora.

Alfredo challenged the status quo, transforming the relationship between landowner and farm workers. He brought a visionary approach to Aquiares, a farm suffering from low prices and instability. Aquiares had more than 200 employee homes on the farm, but because none owned their home, there was great insecurity in the workforce. Alfonso saw this as an opportunity to strengthen the company by having people feel pride in the coffee they produce. He evolved the farm into a small town where workers purchased their own homes. Today, Aquiares remains a model of sustainable agriculture.

Nowadays Alfonso’s son, Diego, manages the farm. Under his lead, the farm has taken a fresh approach to specialty coffee and exploring the farm’s potential. Through excellent agricultural management, embracing new varieties, and experimenting with processing, Aquiares has become a trailblazer among specialty coffee producers in Costa Rica and all of Central America.

Aquiares focuses on carbon neutrality and measures its greenhouse gas emissions to calculate its carbon emissions against its offsets. An agent verified under International Panel on Climate Change norms verifies these calculations and Aquiares’ carbon measurement and emissions reduction are part of Costa Rica’s Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Action. In addition to capturing carbon, the farm’s protected biological corridors have long ensured the wellbeing of local animals and plants. Aquiares also welcomes researchers from around the world to conduct agricultural and environmental studies on their land. Projects have included investigating the benefits of agroforestry on soil health and observing the diverse bird and wildlife species that thrive in an agroecological environment.

Aquiares is an example of innovation and perseverance whose benefits extend beyond the farm and workers and serve as a model for sustainable, equitable production for the broader coffee industry.

We currently have two lots from Aquiares Estate;

Natural Anaerobic lot
Centroamericano H1 is an F1 hybrid variety generated by crossing the Sarchimor T-5296 and a wild Rume Sudan variety. It is reproduced through a tissue culture cloning process called somatic embryogenesis. This cultivar has been distributed among coffee producers in Central America over the last decade and the first productive harvests are now available. Turrialba’s climate is well suited to growing this new variety and Aquaires is up to the challenge of meeting its complex nutritional needs.

The Centroamericano variety was especially selected for Anaerobic Natural processing because of its high mucilage content. The cherries are floated and washed with fresh water but not depulped. Afterwards, the coffee is placed in a stainless steel tank with a one-way air valve. In the tank the coffee will start to ferment with the natural microorganisms and yeast present on the coffee cherries. The fermentation will push out all the oxygen and after one or two hours the anaerobic environment is created within the tank. This fermentation continues for a total time of 24 hours. After fermenting the cherries are washed again with fresh water and dried in the solar dryer. First for two days they are placed on a ceramic patio and finish drying in layered beds within the solar dryer.

Unlike a lot of other anaerobics the flavours of the Aquiares Anaerobic are less intense but more layered and complex. You’ll find flavours of grapefruit, strawberry, caramel and orange.

 

Washed Peaberry lot

Peaberry coffee is named for its pea-like appearance. Most coffee cherries contain two seeds and Peaberries occur when only one seed, small and round in shape, develops in the cherry. Around 5 percent of all coffee is peaberry beans, but usually these are not separated.
Aquiares separated the peaberry and made this beautiful lot. This lot was mechanically washed and dried on raised beds in a solar dryer for 18 to 24 days.

 

Region

Turrialba

Plantation

Aquiares Estate

Altitude

1.200 metres above sea level

Plant variety

Centroamericano

Process

Natural anaerobic

Tasting notes

Grapefruit, strawberry & caramel

Curious about this coffee?

Region

Turrialba

Plantation

Aquiares Estate

Altitude

1.200 metres above sea level

Plant variety

Caturra

Process

Washed

Tasting notes

Milk chocolate, caramel & orange

Curious about this coffee?
HUAIMAELIAM_ZAK
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Thailand Huai Mae Liam

Huai Mae Liam is a coffee producing village whose coffee has never been exported before this year. In the past, the coffee from this village got sent to bigger villages like Doi Chang and Doi Pangkhon and had been marketed under the names of those famous villages. It is important that we recognize the effort of coffee farmers from Huai Mae Liam by giving them the identity they deserve.
This lot is from a specific farm owned by Asor Merlaeku (38), one of the most sophisticated farmers we have encountered. Beanspire, the exporter of the coffee, experimented with Asor on this process last season and are able to replicate on a slightly larger scale this season.
The coffee cherries are anaerobically rested inside GrainPro bags for 5 days after picking and flotation. GrainPro is a hermatic bag that prevents oxygen from coming in, but also oxygen to permeate out, closely mimicking a vacuum environment. This creates an anaerobic fermentation process that adds complexity and sweetness to the coffee.
After fermentation the coffee cherries are dried on bamboo raised beds for 3 weeks, before being cured further in GrainPro for 1 month.
The result is a really interesting coffee with both very clear (tropical) fruit notes, combined with an underlying base of  more dark chocolate notes.

 

Region

Chiang Rai

Plantation

Huai Mae Liam

Altitude

1.350 metres above sea level

Plant variety

Catuai, Chiang Mai, Typica

Process

Natural anaerobic

Tasting notes

Strawberry, tropical fruit & milk chocolate

Curious about this coffee?
INDIA_ZAK
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India Thogarihunkal

The estate’s history goes back to 1857. Located in the slopes of outer Giries of Western Ghat, in a Karnataka region, Chikmagalur. The area is the birthplace of Indian coffee culture and gained its trading importance together with the beginning of coffee cultivation on its terrain.

At 1000-1400 meters above sea level T B Malle Gowda in the 19th century realized that the place is perfect for growing arabica plants hence, together with the British established coffee estate. The plantation was run further by his son T B Nagesh who shared his father’s passion for coffee.

Farmers nurture a mixed cropping system that cultivates coffee harmoniously with other plants and trees such as pepper vines, cloves, dadaps, and wild figs. Thogarihankal Estate is considered to be a wildlife sanctuary, Don’t be surprised if you spot a Green Pigeon, Siberian Crane, or a Whistling Teal here.

What makes coffee from this estate so great is the consistency of growing high-quality coffee beans over the years.

 

Region

Baba Budangiri Hills

Plantation

Thogarihunkal Estate

Altitude

1.000 – 1.400 metres above sea level

Plant variety

Catuai & Sarchimore

Process

Natural anaerobic

Tasting notes

Almond, honey & chocolate

Curious about this coffee?